Leadership: Ethics, Power, and Decision-Making in a Volatile Public Sphere

Content Overview

Is it possible to undertake whole-hearted, effective public service in the 21st century without losing your soul? Through this program, participants will discover that the answer is a resounding yes. The 2-day Leadership: Ethics, Power, and Decision-Making in a Volatile Public Sphere program takes a cross-cultural approach to professional ethics, specifically in the public sector. A close analysis of cases from around the world is the foundation upon which we will build an account of the competencies needed to be a public servant in times of moral ambiguity. Insights from the ever-growing field of moral psychology will be put into conversation with classic and contemporary ethical theory from both Western and Eastern traditions. Special emphasis will be placed on how to think and act strategically when balancing professional obligations with personal morality in the pursuit of creating public value. It will provide an opportunity for participants to workshop their own cases with their peers in an effort to scrutinize, evaluate, and learn from the ethical issues that may have already arisen in their professional lives.

Most of the cases used will be to familiarize participants with the ethical nature and dilemmas of public life in Asian society. The most common approach to ethics in government focuses on avoiding impropriety and is taught by looking at criminal laws and sanctions. This is generally a negative, punitive, and technical view, stressing ethical boundaries as determined by the law. Typical examples include conflicts of interest, misuse of public resources, whistle blowing, and resignation in protest. Though these matters are at times important, they arise so infrequently in relation to the daily dilemmas faced by decision makers, and seldom have implications beyond the career of the particularly affected administrator.

 

Objectives

Taking a different approach, the  program primarily aims to propose a more enlightened yet grounded framework of what it means to be an ethical leader in a public space rife with unpredictable public expectations, loyalties, and dynamics. Through the program, participants will examine ethical dilemmas and concerns that arise from the daily exercise of discretionary authority and be able to identify ultimate accountability in terms of ethical obligations. Participants will take advantage of an avenue for self-reflection on their own ethical challenges and ambiguities by asking questions  such as “How do I make ‘right’ or ‘wise’ decisions?”, “What is a ‘wise’ decision?”, “To what and to whom do my ethical obligations extend?”, “Should/do I have sufficient authority to make a decision?”, “What values do I serve, and what are their priorities?” Participants will leave with a tool kit for applying ethical considerations towards a clearer personal vision of powerful yet ethical leadership. 

 

Methodology

Participants will engage in plenary sessions, interactive workshops, and case discussions with a Teaching Fellow from  Harvard University. It also serves as a forum of small group discussion by participants in discussing some of the ethical and leadership challenges they are facing (or have faced).

 

Who Should Attend

This program is ideal for key decision makers and senior leaders in the public sector.

 

Key Benefits

Through the program, participants will:

  • Strategize how to balance the different types of ethical obligations involved in public administration in the increasingly volatile Asian context;
  • Learn to integrate and apply various types of moral judgment in complex administrative contexts;
  • Map out the relationship of constitutional and governance theory to the ethical obligations and loyalties of public administrators;
  • Identify typical moral dilemmas in public sector decision making;
  • Gain a deeper understanding of how individual personality and thought processes may impact decision making
  • Develop strategies for using one’s character to build value-add relationships in the public sphere

Faculty Director

Samuel Kim
President, Center for Asia Leadership | Harvard University, MPA

Samuel is the Co-founder and President of the Center for Asia Leadership. Passionate about nurturing and empowering talents in Asia, he has been actively engaging various stakeholders in developing and running over 42 programs annually in more than 27 countries in Asia to help emerging leaders explore opportunities to be socially responsible in facing the region’s complex challenges. Samuel oversees them, along with a team of 36 comprising Faculty and Teaching Fellows from Harvard and Stanford University, and administrators at the main office in Boston, U.S., and the Asian regional hubs in Kuala Lumpur, Seoul, Manila, and Tokyo.. Prior to establishing the Center, Samuel worked for 14 years in varying sectors from strategy consulting and social entrepreneurship to international development, politics, and government. He served as a Visiting Fellow at the Asia Center at Harvard University and at the Kellogg School of Management in Northwestern University. He holds a Masters of Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and completed his undergraduate studies in law and political science.

Teaching Faculty 

Professor Dean Williams

Professor Dean Williams
Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy. Harvard University

Professor Dean Williams teaches at Harvard University’s Kennedy School and is based at the Center for Public Leadership. He is the author of Real Leadership: Helping People and Organizations Face Their Toughest Challenges and Leadership for a Fractured World: How to Cross Boundaries, Build Bridges, and Lead Change. Dean served as an adviser on reform and development for the governments of Australia, Singapore, Nigeria, Brunei, East Timor and Madagascar, and consulted with numerous corporations worldwide on leadership development and organizational change. One of Williams’ goals, is to bring “full reality” into the classroom and the field of leadership.”

“Dean Williams is an idealist who has set out to embrace the challenges of the real world” – from the article Leadership: Real and Imagined


Application & Further Enquiries


Contact Person: Nirva Delacruz
Phone: +63917-809-8800 / +63998-858-4413
Email: [email protected]

Hourly Schedule

Day 1

08:00 - 08:30
Registration / Breakfast
08:30 - 08:50
Opening Remarks & Program Introduction - Speakers & Participants, Expectations | Session 1: Defining Ethics and Morality
Types of Ethics; Types of Moral Judgments
08:50 - 09:00
Break
09:00 - 10:10
Session 2: Distinguishing Public from Private Ethics
Reading: Briefing #3, “Public & Private Morality”; and excerpt from Morgan et.al., Administrative Responsibility & Ethics pp.111-115.; Answer to Study Question #1: Viewing Civility as Ethics; Case: Gift of Life
10:10 - 10:20
Break
10:20 - 11:40
Session 3: The First Ten Rules of Civility
Case: Woman in Corridor
11:40 - 12:40
Lunch
12:40 - 14:00
Session 4: The Remaining 15 Rules of Civility
Case: Prisoner Master’s Dilemma
14:00 - 14:10
Break
14:10 - 15:30
Session 5: Public Ethics and the Problem of Character
Case: McNarama’s Vietnam War
15:30 - 15:40
Break
15:40 - 16:50
Session 6: Integrity and Public Moral Character
Reading: Dobel chap. 1; O’Leary chap 4; Discussion: What do you think of Claude Ferguson’s character and actions?
16:50 - 17:00
Q & A Session & Debrief
17:00 -
End

Day 2

08:00 - 08:30
Registration / Breakfast
08:30 - 08:50
Session 7: Review
08:50 - 09:00
Break
09:00 - 10:10
Session 8: Temptations of Power and the Problems of Compromise
Reading: Dobel, chaps. 2-3; Case: 2008 Financial Crisis; Discussion: The promise and problems of compromise
10:10 - 10:20
Break
10:20 - 11:40
Session 9: Ethical Practice and Lying
Reading: Bok, chaps 1-7; Case: Amazon at Its Inception
11:40 - 12:40
Lunch
12:40 - 14:00
Session 10: Bureaucratic Responsibility and Managing Inefficient/Corrupt Government
Reading: O’Leary chap. 4-5; Case: Singapore, Inc.
14:00 - 14:10
Break
14:10 - 15:30
Session 11: Patriotism, Honor, and Humility in Public Life
Discussion: What does it mean to have honor? How can bureaucratic life enervate honor?; Case: India’s Avarind Eye Hospital
15:30 - 15:40
Break
15:40 - 16:50
Session 12: Privacy and Prudence
Case: Brunei’s Lost Opportunities
16:50 - 17:00
Debrief and Closing Ceremony
17:00 -
End

Date

Jan 30 2020 - Jan 31 2020

Time

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Cost

USD 1,650 (Early Bird Rate: Until Dec. 9. 2019), USD 1,800 (Regular Rate)

More Info

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Location

EDSA Shangri-la
Mandaluyong, Philippines
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